Blog
By ATLANTA CENTER FOR DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES, PC
April 09, 2021
Category: Skin Treatments
Tags: Skin Cancer  

Twenty percent of Americans will develop skin cancer by the time they're 70, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Fortunately, your dermatologists at the Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Diseases in Cumming, Atlanta, Alpharetta, Roswell, and Sandy Springs, GA, offer skin cancer treatments that can help protect you should you ever develop the disease.

Skin cancer treatment options

Surgery used to be the only way to remove skin cancers. Today, a variety of innovative treatment options and surgical techniques treat skin cancers while minimizing scarring. Skin cancer treatments include:

  • Medication: Medication may be all that's needed to remove skin cancer or precancerous spots in the outer layers of the skin. Medicated cream, lotion, or gel offer an effective way to kill cancerous cells that haven't reached the deeper layers of the skin.
  • Cryotherapy: During cryotherapy, your Cumming, Atlanta, Alpharetta, Roswell, and Sandy Springs, GA,  doctor sprays liquid nitrogen on your skin. This freezes cancer cells, causing them to blister and fall off. Cryotherapy can be helpful in treating precancerous or cancerous growths.
  • Curettage and Electrodessication: The treatment involves scraping off the skin cancer with a special instrument, then applying a gentle electrical current that kills any remaining cells and stops bleeding.
  • Excision: Excision involves removing cancerous cells and a margin of healthy cells surrounding the area with a scalpel. Reconstructive surgery or skin grafts may be needed if the skin cancer is extensive or deep.
  • Mohs Micrographic Surgery: During Mohs surgery, your dermatologist removes a single layer of your skin and examines it under a microscope. If he or she sees cancerous cells, additional layers will be removed one layer at a time until no cancerous cells remain. This surgical technique minimizes scarring, reduces the loss of healthy tissue, and offers a faster recovery time.
  • Radiation Therapy: Radiation therapy may be combined with other therapies or used to treat large tumors or skin cancer in hard-to-reach areas. It may also be an option if you're not healthy enough to undergo surgery.

Are you concerned about a suspicious spot or a change in a mole? Your Cumming, Atlanta, Alpharetta, Roswell, and Sandy Springs, GA, dermatologists at the Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Diseases can diagnose your condition and offer skin cancer treatment options if needed. Schedule your appointment by calling (404) 252-4333 for the Sandy Springs office, (770) 751-1133 for the Roswell office, (404)-252-4333 for the Atlanta Office,(770) 664-5225 for the Alpharetta office, or (770) 844-1902 for the Cumming office.

By ATLANTA CENTER FOR DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES, PC
April 05, 2021
Category: Skin Conditions
Atopic DermatitisWhen we think of skin disorders, we most often assume that these are problems that mostly adults deal with; however, children and teens can also deal with a wide range of skin problems. One of them is atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as pediatric eczema, is a chronic skin problem that causes flare-ups of itchy, dry, red skin.

What causes atopic dermatitis in children?

Atopic dermatitis is surprisingly common among newborns and kids. Certain factors may play a role in whether your child develops atopic dermatitis. Some of these factors include genetics, weather, environment, temperature, and allergies. If dermatitis runs in your family then your child may be more at risk.

What are the signs of pediatric atopic dermatitis?

Not sure if your child is dealing with atopic dermatitis? Many of the symptoms are not unique to atopic dermatitis so it can be difficult to tell. This is why it’s important to turn to a qualified dermatologist if your child is dealing with any of these issues,
  • Dry skin
  • Intensely itchy skin
  • Thick, red, or swollen skin
  • Fluid-filled or crusty bumps on the skin
  • Rough bumps on the face or arms
  • Hives
How is atopic dermatitis treated?

There are several factors that a dermatologist will need to take into account to determine the best treatment plan for your child. Factors such as their overall health as well as the severity of their symptoms will play roles in the type of treatments we recommend. Your child’s treatment plan will include,
  • Avoiding known irritants and triggers such as certain soaps, detergents, and allergens (e.g., pet danger)
  • Keeping your child’s nails trim to prevent scratching and infection
  • Using gentle cleansers and products on your child’s skin
  • Corticosteroid creams
  • Antihistamines
  • Phototherapy (light therapy)
  • Biologics (strong medications used only in severe and unresponsive cases)
If your child is displaying signs of atopic dermatitis, you must schedule an appointment with your dermatologist to find out what’s going on. Any kind of persistent or recurring rash should be looked at by a skincare professional.
By ATLANTA CENTER FOR DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES, PC
March 23, 2021
Category: Skin Conditions
Tags: Skin Tag  
Skin TagIf you’ve ever noticed a little piece of dangling skin on your body, then you’ve most likely found a skin tag. While these little growths are completely benign, they can develop in places where clothes can rub against them and cause discomfort. Skin tags are most often found in and around the armpits, eyelids, groin, and neck. If you find that your skin tag is in an awkward or uncomfortable place, a dermatologist can easily remove it.

Treating Skin Tags Yourself

Chances are good that you’ve already googled “skin tags” and found a variety of home remedies and ways to remove the skin tag yourself. While some methods are safe and even effective at removing skin tags, it’s incredibly important that you consult your dermatologist first before trying any of these at-home treatments.

Not all skin tags should be treated with home remedies. Any large skin tags, are bleeding or painful, or are located in sensitive areas such as the genitals or the eyes should be treated by a dermatologist who will make sure to provide a safe, effective removal treatment.

Turning to a Dermatologist

There are several ways in which a dermatologist can remove skin tags. Some of these methods include,
  • Cryotherapy: Just like with warts, a dermatologist will freeze off the tag with liquid nitrogen (it usually only takes 1-2 treatments to remove the tag)
  • Cauterization: Burning off the skin tag can also effectively remove the benign growth after a couple of treatment sessions
  • Ligation: Tying a thread around the tag will cut off blood flow and make the growth eventually fall off
  • Excision: Your dermatologist may simply cut off the skin tag
If the skin tag isn’t large, uncomfortable, or in an awkward location then there is no reason to remove it; however, we understand that this may be purely for cosmetic reasons. In which case, your dermatologist is happy to remove the skin tag (but your health insurance is unlikely to cover the procedure).

If you want to have a skin tag removed, or if you aren’t sure whether a skin growth could be a tag, you must see your dermatologist first before you start trying any home remedies or treatments. It’s also important that everyone get an annual skin cancer screening with their dermatologist to check for suspicious or potentially cancerous growths.
By ATLANTA CENTER FOR DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES, PC
March 05, 2021
Category: Skin Treatments
Tags: Warts  

WartsWarts are the result of a virus known as the human papillomavirus (HPV), and they can easily be spread from one person to another through skin-to-skin contact or by sharing items such as towels or clothes with the infected individual. While warts of the hands may be unsightly or embarrassing, it’s important to note that these growths are benign and harmless. Here’s what you should know about treating warts, including how a dermatologist will treat this common skin problem.

How do I know that it’s a wart?

If you’ve never had a wart before then you may not know what this little growth is at first. Warts are raised, skin-colored bumps that may be rough to the touch and grainy in appearance. If you look closely at the bump you may notice little black dots. These are small blood vessels. Since warts can be confused for cysts and other lesions, it may be a good idea to see a dermatologist first before you begin treatment.

How are warts treated?

Some people simply wait until their body fights the infection and the wart eventually goes away, but this can take months or even years. People who are dealing with warts in more sensitive and visible places such as their hands are more likely to want to get rid of the wart a lot sooner. Many healthy individuals turn to over-the-counter remedies first. There are salicylic acid solutions that you can apply directly to the wart and will need to continue to reapply regularly. This solution will shed layers of the wart until gone.

While no study tests the effectiveness of duct tape for removing warts, it not an unsafe practice or option (and if it works for you, great!). If you’ve given it a valiant effort to treat the wart on your own but it just doesn’t seem to respond to over-the-counter treatment options, or it returns, then it’s time to see your dermatologist. A dermatologist offers a variety of ways to remove a wart, including,

  • Cryotherapy: Freezing the wart off is a common method for removing warts
  • Cantharidin: A chemical is applied to the wart, which causes it to blister and fall off
  • Surgical excision: If the bumps do not respond to other treatment options or are in hard-to-treat areas, this may be the ideal method for removal

We understand that warts can develop in rather awkward and sometimes uncomfortable places like the hands. If this happens to you and you don’t want to wait until your body clears the infection to get rid of your wart, then a dermatologist can provide you with the treatment you need to remove the wart more quickly.

By ATLANTA CENTER FOR DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES, PC
February 18, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Mole   Dermatologist  
When To See a Dermatologist for a Mole
Worried that all those years of sunbathing have caught up with you? Do you have a family history of skin cancer? If so, these might be reasons to turn to a dermatologist every year for skin cancer screenings. These dermatology screenings can help us catch cancerous lesions early on when they are highly treatable. Of course, you should also be performing your own monthly examinations, checking your skin from head to scalp, to look for skin cancer. Here’s what you should be on the lookout for,

Remember Your ABCDEs

This easy-to-remember acronym will help you spot those signs of skin cancer whenever you examine moles yourself. This is what it stands for,
  • A is for asymmetry: A healthy mole will be perfectly circular and symmetrical. If you find that half of the mole is shaped differently from the other half, this could be a sign of pre-cancerous growth.
  • B is for a border: A healthy mole will have a clearly defined border. If the mole has a jagged or an even or poorly defined border, it’s time to visit your dermatologist.
  • C is for color: A healthy mole will remain a singular color throughout your life. If the mole changes color or develops multiple colors this could be a sign of skin cancer.
  • D is for diameter: A healthy mole is typically smaller than a pencil eraser (under 5mm). Moles over 5mm, or larger than a pencil eraser, may be cause for concern. Large moles warrant seeing a dermatologist.
  • E is for evolving: A healthy mole will remain the same over the course of your lifetime. So, if you notice it changing at all then it’s worth having a dermatologist look at it.
Lookout for These Moles, Too

Along with remembering your ABCDEs, it’s also a good idea to look for,
  • New moles: Just because you develop a new mole doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s cancerous; however, if you start noticing any new moles developing past the age of 20 (particularly on the face, neck, shoulder, or other sun-exposed areas), this warrants an evaluation with a skincare professional.
  • Troublesome moles: Do you have a mole that bleeds, itches, crusts over, or is painful or tender? If so, the mole should be checked out.
If you have a growth that has you concerned, a skin doctor can easily examine and biopsy the growth to determine if it’s cancerous. If it is, we offer a variety of treatment options that can remove the cancerous growth and help you get back to living your life.




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